News Local Turkish company to manage controversial Akkuyu reactor

Turkish company to manage controversial Akkuyu reactor

A Turkish company will take on the operation of the Akkuyu nuclear reactor to be built in the Mersin region, Green Party president Giorgos Perdikis has said on Wednesday, after attending a meeting with the Russian company, Rosatom, constructing the reactor.
 
The Green Party president also expressed his concern on the project, which is set to be built approximately 180km away from Cyprus. 
 
Rosatom met with Parliament President Dimitris Syllouris today, to discuss the project and calm the concerns that were raised about its construction, SigmaLive has learnt.
 
However, Perdikis told SigmaLive that despite the friendly climate in which the meeting was conducted, he expressed his disagreements with the construction of the reactor. 
 
“They attempted to calm the concerns raised, but with the data that they presented to us, we have become more concerned,” he said. 
 
Rosatom told the Cypriot officials that the reactor will be managed by a Turkish company, which is a sister company of the Rosatom. 
 
Perdikis said that the company – set to manage the reactor – is registered in Turkey and will abide by Ankara’s laws.  He added that the company will also be allowed to receive bids for investment of approximately 45 per cent.
 
The Green Party President also told SigmaLive that there appears to be interest from other Arab countries to take on the functioning of the reactor.  
 
REACTOR TO START WORK IN 2023
 
Asked about the project, Perdikis said that the company is awaiting to receive licenses from the Turkish government to begin constructing the reactor.
 
Part of the reactor, Perdikis told Sigmalive, will begin functioning in 2023, when the first phase of the construction project is set to start.  
 
The meeting was attended by a 5-member group, who were accompanied by the Russian Ambassador Stansilav Osadchiy. 
 
The construction of the reactor has been criticised in the past by the EU, Cyprus, and Turkish Cypriot leader Mustafa Akinci
 
Top